Never Ending Story…

long version

long version

According the Yonhap News Agency – major news agency in South Korea, a South Korean government committee on Wednesday criticized as “absurd” Japanese economic bodies’ claim that recent South Korean court rulings ordering Japanese companies to compensate forced Korean laborers during Japan’s colonial rule during World War II could damage economic relations between the two countries.

It’s not an ordinary sense to start the new argument about the incidents happened almost 70 years ago from 1910 to 1945. In addition, all those kinds of argues had already been been done with the agreement of “The Treaty on Basic Relations between Japan and the Republic of Korea” signed on June 22, 1965.

In January 2005, the South Korean government disclosed 1,200 pages of diplomatic documents that recorded the proceeding of the treaty. The documents, kept secret for 40 years, recorded that the Japanese government actually proposed to the Korean government to directly compensate individual victims but it was the South Korean government which insisted that it would handle individual compensation to its citizens and then received the whole amount of grants on the behalf of victims.

short version

short version

The Korean government demanded a total of 364 million dollars in compensation for the 1.03 million Koreans conscripted into the workforce and the military during the colonial period, at a rate of 200 dollars per survivor, 1,650 dollars per death and 2,000 dollars per injured person. South Korea agreed to demand no further compensation, either at the government or individual level, after receiving $800 million in grants and soft loans from Japan as compensation for its 1910–45 colonial (or I should say “Japan’s Annexation of Korea”) rule in the treaty.

It was the South Korean government who used most of the grants for economic development, failing to provide adequate compensation to victims by paying only 300,000 won per death in compensating victims of forced labor between 1975 and 1977. Instead, the SK government spent most of the money establishing social infrastructures, founding POSCO, building Gyeongbu Expressway and the Soyang Dam with the technology transfer from Japanese companies. This investment was named Miracle on the Han River in South Korea.

President Park Geun-hye made a speech in the inaugural address to the President that “Raise the miracle on the Han River again”. It might mean I think, Korea will raise the miracle on the Han River again with more compensation from Japan again.

source from Yonhap News on Nov 6, 2013

Japanese companies also responsible for forced Korean labor: gov’t panel

SEOUL, Nov. 6 (Yonhap) — A South Korean government committee on Wednesday criticized as “absurd” Japanese economic bodies’ claim that recent South Korean court rulings ordering Japanese companies to compensate forced Korean laborers during Japan’s colonial rule during World War II could damage economic relations between the two countries.

Earlier in the day, Japan’s three major economic organizations, including Keidanren and the Japan-Korea economic association, asserted in a joint announcement in Tokyo that the issue of compensating forced labor was “completely and finally” addressed the 1965 agreement that normalized diplomatic relations between the two nations.

They also insisted South Korean lawsuits claiming compensation would harm bilateral economic relations. The Forced Laborer Investigation Committee under the South Korean Prime Minister’s Office here immediately blasted the Japanese companies — which enjoyed large growth at the cost of Korea’s forced labor — for having made such absurd claims.

“Japanese economic groups’ announcement stems from fears that they will have to bear great burdens once the door for compensations opens,” the committee’s chairman Park In-whan said.
Not only is the Japanese government accountable for forced labor, but its businesses are too, and the individual right to demand compensation should be recognized irrespective of the 1965 agreement, he added.

Some 23,500 Koreans were forced to work for Japanese companies during World War II, and 901 of them died under harsh working conditions, according to the committee’s estimate.

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Also source from Yonhap news on the same day

Japanese companies also responsible for forced Korean labor: gov’t panel

SEOUL, Nov. 6 (Yonhap) — A South Korean government committee on Wednesday criticized as “absurd” Japanese economic bodies’ claim that recent South Korean court rulings ordering Japanese companies to compensate forced Korean laborers during Japan’s colonial rule during World War II could damage economic relations between the two countries.

Earlier in the day, Japan’s three major economic organizations, including Keidanren and the Japan-Korea economic association, asserted in a joint announcement in Tokyo that the issue of compensating forced labor was “completely and finally” addressed the 1965 agreement that normalized diplomatic relations between the two nations.

They also insisted South Korean lawsuits claiming compensation would harm bilateral economic relations. The Forced Laborer Investigation Committee under the South Korean Prime Minister’s Office here immediately blasted the Japanese companies — which enjoyed large growth at the cost of Korea’s forced labor — for having made such absurd claims.

Diary , ,

Walking around Nakanoshima

NakanoshimaNakanoshima is a 3 km long and 50 hectares narrow sandbank in Kita-ku, Osaka city, that divides the Kyū(old)-Yodo River into the Tosabori and Dōjima rivers. Many governmental and commercial offices including the city hall of Osaka, museums and other cultural facilities are located on Nakanoshima. Nakanoshima was the place that I often visited at the public library there in the high school days more than 35 years ago. The central public hall of the red brick was not cared for very much in those days. Nakanoshima Park was a simple open field. And there was a beggar man under the bridge. My friends and I named him a rotary beggar man because he was always walking round and round at the very narrow area. There is neither the open field nor the beggar anymore, but very well organized facilities.

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Diary , ,

Back to Osaka

my homeIt is very late report of my status change, and also long absence from my blog posting.

Because of very private reasons, I returned from Tokyo to Osaka on November 30th, 2012. Now I am living together with my mother and aunt in the same house. After more than 30 years absence, I am living at the birth place.

From the StationThere had been many changes in Osaka for those over 30 years. Beside the financial problems that Osaka is facing, for my eyes, most changes seem to be good ones for me, because they are well organized. For example, my town becomes much clean than the past. I can see many improvements everywhere around my home.

Now Osaka becomes much matured city and composure atmosphere than the past, while I miss Osaka’s liveliness at that time. It is just my on-the-surface recognition, but I feel that Osaka might represent the situation of Japan…

Diary

Shrine and written fortune

Whenever I pass by the Tokyo Grand Shrine at Ise, I always stop and bow from the waist in front of the torii.

The reason is that I feel the strong spiritual power in this small but well managed represent in Tokyo for Ise-Jingu Grand Shrine, and I cannot stop resisting my feeling of awe.

This shrine is very famous for god of marriage, so that many women visit there to pray for new love connecting to marriage, or happy marriage with the current love. In addition, the wedding ceremony here just in front of god is possible.

I drew the written fortune here twice for a week. For my surprise, the results were the similar… my future will be better, but need time and must be always cautious.

37. NOT-SO-GOOD FORTUNE
drew on May 23, 2012

At first things do not go your way, but with the good fortune of time passing and with the protection of the Divine, you will at last walk the road of much happiness

  • ILLNESS: Even if prolonged, you will recover.
  • LOVE/MARRIAGE: A bad start, but with time, things improve.
  • THE PERSON YOU WAIT: He will be late.
  • LAWSUITS: You will not win immediately.
  • LOST ITEM: Hard to find, but it may turn up later.
  • BUYING & SELLING: Postpone.
  • BUILDING/MOVING: In the beginning, there are many difficulties; depending on your efforts, they may be resolved.
  • TRAVEL: It may be difficult but the destination is worth it.
  • MONEY: Matters will take time.
  • EXAMINATIONS: There is a prospect for the future, work hard now.

6. NOT-SO-GOOD FORTUNE
drew on May 26, 2012

As if, having been wondering in the wildness, you have now found the main road, there have been many mistakes and misunderstandings; if, knowing your own faults you strive toward reform, believing in the Devine with steadfast spirit, good fortune will be yours at last.

  • ILLNESS: If you follow doctor’s orders and not exceed your limits, you will get better in the long run.
  • LOVE/MARRIAGE: There are some difficulties but if both parties work on it, all will go well.
  • LAWSUIT: Nearly impossible for you to win.
  • LOST ITEM: Will not be found.
  • BUYING & SELLING: Await the right timing.
  • BUILDING/MOVING: Favorable if you are extra cautious.
  • MONEY: Things will improve with time.
  • EXAMINATIONS: With effort, you shall succeed.

Later, I will tie those written fortune to the brunches of tree in the Shrine, to change my fortune better.

Diary , ,

Compensation for the Past

Generally speaking, we should perform the evaluation of the history after 100 years passed. However, I who am a Japanese get tired of the criticism for past Great Japan Empire from some Asian countries.

I often feel that those countries should much consider what they did in their countries before getting the compensations from the current Japan.

I think the manner of the Vietnamese government is excellent. Because they don’t ask any compensations to France, USA, and even Korean military which committed all kinds of the tyranny in Vietnam.

The followings are some examples what their government did in Korea.

Jeju Uprising
The Jeju Uprising was a revolt on Jeju island off the south coast of the Korean Peninsula, beginning on April 3, 1948. Between 14,000 and 60,000 individuals were killed in fighting or execution between various fractions on the island. The suppression of rebellion by the South Korean army has been called “brutal”, resulting in tens of thousands of deaths, the destruction of many villages on the island, and sparking rebellions on the Korean mainland. The rebellion, which included the mutiny of several hundred members of the South Korean 11th Constabulary Regiment, lasted until May 1949, although small isolated pockets of fighting continued into 1953. Many residents of Jeju escaped from the massacre to Japan, and some of them made their Jeju town in Osaka.

Yeosu-Suncheon Rebellion
The Yeosu-Suncheon Rebellion, also known as the Yeo-Sun incident, was an October 1948 rebellion, that took place in Yeosu, Suncheon, and surrounding towns, South Jeolla against the fledgling South Korean Syngman Rhee government largely cued by that government’s suppression of the Jeju Uprising and refusal of Yeosu soldiers to help suppress the rebellion. In Yeosu, the rebelling South Korean soldiers seized weapons and took control of the town. The residents paraded through the town holding red flags. They restored the town people’s committee, and tried and executed a number of police, officials, and landlords. The rebelling soldiers increased between 2,000 and 3,000, and massacred rights families and Christian youth. After one week the South Korean army overwhelmed the rebels. The matter was reviewed by the South Korean Truth and reconciliation commission, which found that government forces killed between 439 and 2000 area civilians. U.S. forces played a role in suppressing the rebellion: U.S. commanders planned and directed the military operations, U.S. military advisors accompanied all ROK units, and U.S. aircraft were used to transport troops.
Park Chung-hee, who would later become the president of Korea, participated in the rebellion. It is alleged, however, that he was punished leniently in exchange for agreeing to hunt down those involved.

Geochang massacre
The Geochang massacre (Korean: 거창 양민학살 사건, Hanja: 居昌良民虐殺事件) was a massacre conducted by the third battalion of the 9th regiment of the 11th Division of the South Korean Army between 9 February 1951 and 11 February 1951 of 719 unarmed citizens in Geochang, South Gyeongsang district of South Korea. The victims included 385 children. The 11th Division also conducted the Sancheong-Hamyang massacre two days earlier. The general commanding the division was Choe Deok-sin.
In March 1951, a lawmaker from Geochang reported the massacre to the National Assembly against South Korean Army cover up. The National Assembly’s special investigation team investigated, but failed by the South Korean Army interruption. In May 1951, the second investigation team was dispatched by the National Assembly and they reported the South Korean Army involvement. After the research, Major Han and Colonel Oh Ik-gyun were sentenced to life in prison by a military court. However, soon President Rhee Syngman granted clemency to criminals. This massacre is pointed out one of the Rhee Syngman’s misdeeds.
In April 2004, the Geochang Massacre Memorial Park was founded in memory of the victims, in Geochang.
On 20 February 2006, National Archives and Records Service reported the files about the massacre were found.
In 2001, a local court ordered the South Korean government to pay reparations to the victims’ families. On 18 May 2004, a general court ruled that a charge of massacre against the South Korean governmental was barred by limitation, and on 5 June 2008, the South Korean Supreme Court confirmed that the charge was barred by limitation.

Diary